Hatching Projects: Not all they’re cracked up to be

Hi friends 🙂

I am ending my extended blogging break by introducing an article that I wrote about classroom hatching projects for Discordia Zine.

 

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Chicks in the classroom: Not all it’s cracked up to be

The children squeal and jostle as they compete for a good viewing spot.

‘Ok, boys and girls, do you all remember what to do?’ The question is largely rhetorical. Of course they remember! They have practised many times, and all have eagerly awaited this moment.

‘Cluck, cluck…cluck, cluck’. The teacher joins the chorus of children’s voices. Their efforts are rewarded: An egg with a pronounced crack emits a faint chirp.

One by one, the inhabitants of the eggs emerge into an incubator; to a motherless existence. The chicks do not experience the welcoming chirps or body warmth of a doting and nurturing mother. Instead, a heat lamp set to 37 degrees Celsius provides their only warmth. They will never know the comfort of snuggling beneath a mother’s outstretched wing.

An unhatched egg lies still, and silent. Several of the children express their concerns for the unborn chick. The teacher knows that it should have hatched by now: the chick is dead.

What is a hatching project?

Hatching projects are promoted as ‘fun and easy do-it-yourself programs that enable children to see chicks actually hatching from their eggs’. School teachers are particularly encouraged to use hatching projects in their classrooms, and some companies also offer hatching projects to nursing homes.

 

To continue reading, click here.

 

Photo credit: ozecha

 

 

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