Shining a light on Australia’s pig farming industry

Back in August, I interviewed Chris Delforce, the writer and producer of Lucent, a new Australian documentary.

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Lucent provides a comprehensive exposé of the largely hidden Australian pig farming industry.

Chris told me about the disturbing findings that undercover footage has revealed on Australian pig farms – the diseased and distressed sows; the dead and dying piglets; the painful procedures performed on piglets without anaesthesia; the beatings and abuse inflicted on pigs by workers; and the overcrowding and cannibalism.

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Lucent premiered in Sydney in October, and has screened in other states.  On Sunday 23 November, Lucent is screening in Brisbane at Event Cinemas, Brisbane City Myer Centre from 3.00 – 5.00 pm. To purchase tickets, click here.

To read my article Lucent: Exposing the Australian pig farming industry, click here.

For more information about Lucent, Australian pig farming and Aussie Farms, click here.

Image credit: Aussie Farms

Animal testing for cosmetics: Is the end in sight?

The European Union banned animal testing for cosmetics and the import of animal-tested cosmetics in 2013. An Australian Senator, Lee Rhiannon, seeks to introduce an identical ban in Australia.

The Australian cosmetics industry argues that a ban is unnecessary, as animal testing of cosmetics has not occurred in Australia in recent years.

My latest article for The Scavenger explores the issue of animal testing of cosmetics in Australia, and provides a global overview.

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‘Unimaginable pain and suffering is endured by half a million mice, rats, guinea pigs and rabbits for the global beauty industry each year. Their tiny bodies are poisoned and burned; they endure blindness and mutilation.

Rabbits are subjected to eye and skin irritation tests, in which chemicals are dripped into eyes and rubbed onto exposed and abraded skin.

Guinea pigs, a popular companion animal of young children, endure skin allergy testing.

Rodents are subjected to “acute oral toxicity” tests, where a substance is forced down his or her throat, and directly into their stomach, via a syringe.

“Lethal dose” tests are conducted by forcing the animal to swallow large amounts of a test chemical. As the name suggests, this test determines the dose that causes death.

Animals in laboratories are wholly at the mercy of the humans who use their bodies as testing implements. Rodents, rabbits and guinea pigs – small animals who are gentle and docile (the very characteristics that make them popular children’s companions) – are completely defenceless.

Once their ‘usefulness’ as laboratory tools has ceased, they are killed by asphyxiation, neck-breaking or decapitation (without anaesthesia).’

To continue reading, click here.

Ally

photo credit: iStock

Cowspiracy: An interview with film makers Kip Andersen and Keegan Kuhn

 “The incredibly far-reaching destruction caused by animal agriculture is almost overwhelming. What I found the most shocking is that land-based animal agriculture is the leading cause of ocean ‘dead zones’ due to the massive pollution runoff from factory farms, and all the fields of chemically raised feed crops that the animals are fed.”  – Keegan Kuhn, film maker

 

Cowspiracy: The Sustainability Secret has been touted as the film that environmental organisations don’t want you to see.

 

To find out why, click here to check out my interview with Cowspiracy film makers, Kip Andersen and Keegan Kuhn, published by The Scavenger.

 

Ally

 

 

Zoos: Killing for Conservation

Earlier this year, Copenhagen Zoo sparked worldwide outrage when it killed a healthy 18 month old giraffe, then feed sections of his body to resident lions. The zoo claimed that Marius’ genes were already ‘well represented’ in the European giraffe breeding program.

Weeks later, the zoo killed four healthy lions to make way for a new male ‘breeding’ lion.

This month, a Swiss zoo killed a healthy Russian brown bear cub.

 

 

My latest article for The Scavenger,  Killing in the name of conservation, reveals a largely hidden side of zoos. That is, the killing of healthy animals is regarded as a legitimate form of population management.

But this aspect of zoos is one that stands in conflict to their public face as conservationists and caretakers.

Moreover, captive breeding programs in zoos (referred to as ‘extinction insurance’) breed animals that are largely ill equipped for life in the wild.

To read my article, click here.

 

{A-Z:Veganism} L is for Lamb

Mary had a little lamb, little lamb, little lamb. Mary had a little lamb its [sic] fleece was white as snow….’

Lamb: a baby sheep. Adorable, gentle and vulnerable. The subject of a well-known children’s nursery rhyme, and frequent character in young children’s books.

Lamb: the main ‘ingredient’ of a popular Sunday night dinner – the ‘lamb roast’. Lamb as ‘tasty’ meal; a taste bud ‘pleaser’.

To market we go

Australia is the world’s second largest exporter of lamb.

In the 2012-2013 financial year, Australia produced 456 997 tonnes of lamb. 51% of this total was exported to overseas markets. The Middle East is the biggest export market for Australian lamb. Other major lamb export markets are China and the United States.

In Australia, lamb is marketed heavily as a national dish in the lead-up to Australia Day (26 January) each year. In fact, Australia is the largest single market for Australian lamb, with 9.7kg of lamb consumed per person in 2012-2013. This equates to an estimated annual expenditure of $2 billion.

The marketing of lamb

A popular television ad that screened in the late 1980’s features a young woman receiving a phone call at work with the thrilling news that she has won a ‘romantic dinner’ with Tom Cruise! This once-in-a-lifetime date – including dinner in a ‘top city restaurant’ and stretch limo transfers – is to take place that very night. The same night that her mum is cooking a lamb roast for dinner.

The young woman decisively declines the date with Tom in favour of an oven-baked, baby sheep’s leg. Her work colleagues are almost speechless. Her father, on the other hand, states: ‘Never mind love, you can go out with him any night’. The ad ends with the slogan: ‘Nothing comes before a roast lamb dinner’.

These days, lamb is flogged to Australians by Meat and Livestock Australia’s mouthpiece and ‘lambassador’, Sam Kekovich. This annual promotion takes the tack that lamb is Australia’s national dish. Those who do not partake are un-Australian. This year, vegans were a target of the lambassador’s ‘pro-BBQ lamb’ agenda.

In the article, ‘Carno-nationalism and cultural lambnesia, Peter Chen argues that lamb is not actually a traditional Australian food. He asserts:

‘…the introduction of sheep in Australia was primarily for the purpose of wool production, and potentially productive sheep were too valuable to just eat as infants. Where sheep meat did become popular, this was more a response to the necessities of the wool glut in the 1980 and 90s than a reflection of a national characteristic.

During Autumn 2013, to coincide with Mothers’ Day in Australia, a Meat and Livestock Australia promotion announced that mini-lamb roasts were so ‘easy to cook that literally anyone can do it’- even tattooed men, according to one of the promotional posters. The promotion attempts to link lamb roast preparation and motherhood:

‘The traditional Lamb roast is a family meal that is forever synonymous with the ‘nurture gene’ and being a mum. It’s the one meal we all return home for, because it’s just too hard or too time consuming for us to cook ourselves – and Mum makes it look so easy!’

This portrayal of motherhood is ludicrous and offensive: A nurturing mother slaving away in the kitchen, preparing a time consuming and complicated meal of baby sheep for her grown offspring, who are incapable of cooking it for themselves. The meal of lamb is a symbol of her love, and a demonstration of her ‘inherent’ female caring.

In another promotion, called ‘We Love our Lamb on Mother’s Day’, Kekovich portrays a school child who tells his classmates: ‘…if you really, truly want to show mum she’s special, cook her a lamb roast. She’ll love you for it’.

Lambs to the slaughter

Current projections indicate that 20.95 million lambs will be slaughtered in Australia in 2014. That is equivalent to more than 55 000 lambs killed per day, every day, for 12 months.

That figure represents an enormous amount of pain, terror, suffering and grief – for the lambs and their mothers, from whom they are forcibly weaned at approximately 14 weeks of age. Life on the farm is not idyllic for lambs. They are subjected to tail docking without anaesthesia, and young males may endure castration without pain relief.

The Model Code of Practice for the Welfare of Animals: The Sheep is a set of guidelines that provides detailed minimum standards to assist ‘sheep producers’ to understand the standard of care required to meet their obligations under Australian legislation.

Clause 10.3 permits the use of clubbing to kill lambs that are deemed to require euthanasia:

‘Lambs (but not adults) may be stunned by a heavy blow to the back of the neck to render them unconscious. This should be followed immediately by bleeding out.’

Clause 9.3 of the Model Code discusses tail docking, a practice that is ‘recommended’ for blowfly control and involves the removal of a section of tail. Apparently, it is preferable for the procedure to be performed on lambs aged between 2 and 12 weeks of age. Disturbingly, the Model Code states that only lambs over 6 months of age require an anaesthetic.

So, what are the acceptable methods of tail docking without anaesthesia?

They are listed as: ‘cutting with a sharp knife’ or ‘rubber rings applied according to the manufacturer’s recommendations’, or ‘a gas flame heated searing iron used according to the manufacturer’s recommendations’.

Castration of male lambs is also permitted without anaesthetic if performed before 6 months of age. However, if lambs are to be slaughtered before puberty, that is, prior to 3 – 6 months of age, ‘castration may be unnecessary’. Acceptable methods include cutting with a clean, sharp knife (to remove the testes) or the application of a rubber ring to disrupt blood flow to the testes, destroying their function.

Meat and Livestock Australia (MLA) discusses early weaning of lambs. It is referred to as a ‘management practice’ that is ‘useful’ during drought periods, and one that enables ewes to ‘gain their condition faster, resulting in higher conception rates at the next joining’. Weaning is acknowledged as a ‘stressful time’ for lambs and, in order to ‘help reduce the stress’, ‘sheep producers’ are encouraged to keep lambs ‘out of sight and hearing range of their [mothers] immediately after weaning’.

Also, ‘sheep producers’ are referred to a web site called ‘Making More From Sheep’, a joint project of Australian Wool Innovation and MLA. The site includes 11 modules, including one called: Wean More Lambs.

Ewe are not special

As Mother’s Day approaches in Australia, perhaps we’ll see another MLA promotion encouraging people to celebrate their mothers by serving a lamb roast.

The industry does not have any regard for the bond of motherhood between a ewe and her baby. Mother sheep are not ‘special’. The focus of the industry is to maximise profits by weaning lambs early in order to impregnate ewes as frequently as possible. The mother, the ewe, only has value as a producer of lambs.

On Mother’s Day, I will not be celebrating my mum, or my role as mother, by consuming the offspring of another mother.

Ally

In My A-Z of Veganism series, I discuss and explore a topic or issue related to veganism, and my experiences as a vegan – as I work my way through the alphabet!

 

 

{Recipe} Pear and Walnut Cake (plus, ‘what’s going on at Made of Stars?’)

Hello friends!

This is my first recipe post in over 3 months, and it may be my last for a little while too. Let me explain…..

During my blogging break, I took on a commitment that is very important to me and which requires a significant time outlay. Namely, I was offered a role as an Associate Editor at The Scavenger, an online magazine run by Katrina Fox. Naturally, I said ‘yes’!

I wrote a couple of articles for the Scavenger in 2011, about vegan pregnancy and vegan diets for children, and I am thrilled to be involved more directly with the magazine.

In my role as Associate Editor, I plan to continue to write – and source – articles on topics that I am passionate about: animal rights, veganism, vegan parenting and social justice. Some of you know that I have a background in social work, and that I currently work in the community, not-for-profit sector. This also inspires my writing.

So, what does that mean for Made of Stars?

Regretfully, I will no longer be able to commit to a weekly recipe post. Rather, I will post recipes on an irregular basis, as inspiration strikes me. However, I promise I won’t take 3 months to post my next recipe!

Also, I plan to continue working on my A-Z of veganism series (L is for… is currently in the works). In addition, I will link to my articles on The Scavenger if I think they may be of interest to readers of Made of Stars.

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I developed this recipe when we had an abundance of very ripe pears in our fruit bowl. I have made it several times now. It is a moreish and scrumptious cake, suitable for afternoon tea with friends or as a lunch box treat (I have been know to pack a slice in my lunch box for work).

Moreover, the pears can be replaced with thinly sliced apples. I did this on one occasion, and was very happy with the result.

I use coconut sugar, but you could substitute with your preferred sugar if you don’t have coconut sugar in your pantry.

The tiny vegans also enjoy this cake but I am sure that doesn’t surprise you. 🙂 Little Baker enjoys helping with the preparation. When he sees a mixing bowl, he calls out: ‘mix, Mummy, mix’.  Which means: ‘hand over the spatula, Mum’!

Ingredients

(quantity: 10-12 slices)

1 1/4 cups wholemeal plain flour

1 tsp baking powder

1/4 tsp baking soda, sifted

3/4 cup coconut sugar

1/4 cup walnut pieces

1/3 cup sunflower oil

3/4 cup soy milk (or other plant-based milk)

1 tsp vanilla extract

1/2 tsp white vinegar

1 large ripe pear

Method

1. Pre-heat oven to 180C/350F. Grease and line a spring form cake tin.

2. Combine all of the dry ingredients in a large mixing bowl, including the walnuts. Mix well, then set aside.

3. Use a vegetable peeler to peel the pear, then core and cut into thin slices. Set aside.

4. To a jug or small mixing bowl, add the oil, soy milk, vanilla and vinegar. Mix well with a fork or whisk, then add to the dry ingredients. Mix well until combined, but do not over-stir.

5. Transfer the batter to the cake tin, and smooth the top. Then arrange the pear slices on the top. I also add a walnut half to the centre. Bake for 35 mins (or until an inserted skewer comes out clean).

6. Store leftovers in an air tight container.

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Wishing you all a beautiful week.

Ally 🙂

 

Hatching Projects: Not all they’re cracked up to be

Hi friends 🙂

I am ending my extended blogging break by introducing an article that I wrote about classroom hatching projects for Discordia Zine.

 

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Chicks in the classroom: Not all it’s cracked up to be

The children squeal and jostle as they compete for a good viewing spot.

‘Ok, boys and girls, do you all remember what to do?’ The question is largely rhetorical. Of course they remember! They have practised many times, and all have eagerly awaited this moment.

‘Cluck, cluck…cluck, cluck’. The teacher joins the chorus of children’s voices. Their efforts are rewarded: An egg with a pronounced crack emits a faint chirp.

One by one, the inhabitants of the eggs emerge into an incubator; to a motherless existence. The chicks do not experience the welcoming chirps or body warmth of a doting and nurturing mother. Instead, a heat lamp set to 37 degrees Celsius provides their only warmth. They will never know the comfort of snuggling beneath a mother’s outstretched wing.

An unhatched egg lies still, and silent. Several of the children express their concerns for the unborn chick. The teacher knows that it should have hatched by now: the chick is dead.

What is a hatching project?

Hatching projects are promoted as ‘fun and easy do-it-yourself programs that enable children to see chicks actually hatching from their eggs’. School teachers are particularly encouraged to use hatching projects in their classrooms, and some companies also offer hatching projects to nursing homes.

 

To continue reading, click here.

 

Photo credit: ozecha

 

 

{Recipe} Corn Fritters and Tartar Sauce (gluten-free, soy-free)

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Source: Arbon Publishing

Today, I feature two delicious recipes* from ‘Veganissimo! Beautiful Vegan Food’ by Leigh Drew.

Corn Fritters and Tartar Sauce are gluten-free and soy-free recipes.

Corn Fritters

serves: 12–14 fritters

preparation time: 15 minutes

cooking time: 1 hour

***

Ingredients 

1 1⁄2 cups (10 oz/285 g) corn kernels (fresh or frozen)

1 medium red onion, finely chopped

1 garlic clove, minced

1 medium capsicum (red bell pepper), finely chopped

1 bunch (approx. 4 oz/115 g) coriander (cilantro), finely chopped

1 cup (5 1⁄2 oz/155 g) masa harina or polenta

1⁄2 cup (2 oz/60 g) chickpea flour (garbanzo bean flour)

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon ground black pepper

1 cup (8 fl oz/240 ml) soy-free or soy non-dairy milk

1⁄4 cup (2 fl oz/60 ml) olive oil

 Method

1. Preheat the oven to 190°C (375°F). Line a baking/cookie tray with kitchen baking paper.

2. In a large bowl, mix together the corn kernels, red onion, garlic, capsicum (bell pepper), and coriander (cilantro). Stir through the masa harina or polenta, chickpea flour (garbanzo bean flour),salt, and ground black pepper. Pour in the non-dairy milk and olive oil, and mix the ingredients together well. Set the bowl aside.

3. Place a nonstick or cast-iron frying pan over medium heat. Form ½-cup portions of the mixture into patties, and pan fry the fritters in batches of three or four at a time. Cook the fritters for about 5–7 minutes or until they are golden on the underside, flip and fry them for a further 3–5 minutes, and then place the fritters onto the baking/cookie tray. Place the fritters into the oven to bake for 15 minutes or until they are fully cooked and set in the center.

Serve with tartar sauce (recipe to follow).

***

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Source: Arbon Publishing

Tartar Sauce 

Preparation time: 5 minutes, plus overnight soaking of cashews

Cooking time: none

Yields: 2 cups

***

Ingredients

1 cup (41⁄2 oz/130 g) cashews, soaked overnight and drained

3⁄4 cup (6 fl oz/180 ml) water

1⁄4 cup (2 fl oz/60 ml) white balsamic vinegar

1 tablespoon lemon juice

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

1 garlic clove, minced

1⁄2 teaspoon salt

1⁄2 teaspoon white pepper

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 bunch chives (approx. 1⁄2 oz/15 g), finely chopped

1⁄3 cup (21⁄2 oz/70 g) finely chopped gherkins (cornichons)

1⁄4 cup (11⁄2 oz/45 g) finely chopped capers

Method

Place the cashews, water, white balsamic vinegar, lemon juice, Dijon mustard, garlic, salt, white pepper, and olive oil into a food processor. Blend the ingredients until the sauce is smooth. Pour the sauce into a bowl, and stir through the chives, gherkins (cornichons), and capers.

 Tartar sauce can be used on sandwiches, served with pan-fried or battered tofu, and even offered as a dip.

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For my review of Veganissimo! Beautiful Vegan Food, click here.

* The recipes and specified photos are reproduced on Made of Stars with the kind permission of Arbon Publishing, Sydney.

Each Monday I feature a delicious vegan recipe – or two! 

Ally 🙂

{Recipe} Nut-free lunchbox snacks: chilli and parsley crackers; oaty carob bites

The following recipes are suitable for a nut-free lunchbox.

Many of the lunchbox snacks that I prepare at home contain nuts, as my school-aged tiny vegans are not restricted from bringing nuts to school. However, 4 year old Tiny Vegan began attending a ‘nut-free’ pre-school earlier this year. Consequently, this has inspired me to experiment with nut-free lunchbox snacks.

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These tasty crackers consist of dried chilli flakes, fresh parsley, nutritional yeast, ground flaxseeds, tahini, oats and brown rice flour.

This recipe was inspired by a gluten-free cracker that I featured during Vegan MoFo. I decided to experiment with a nut-free cracker recipe that consists of pantry staples – like dried chilli flakes and tahini – and fresh herbs. I chose parsley as it grows so abundantly in our little herb garden.

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Ingredients

(Quantity – approximately 40 small crackers)

1 cup rolled oats

1/4 cup brown rice flour

1/4 cup nutritional yeast (savoury yeast flakes)

1 Tbsp ground flaxseeds (golden or brown)

1/2 tsp salt

1/8 – 1/4 tsp chilli flakes

1 tightly packed tsp of finely chopped fresh parsley

1/4 tsp asofoetida (hing) or garlic powder

2 tsp tahini (sesame paste)

5 Tbsp water

Method

1. Pre-heat oven to 180C/160C fan-forced/350F. Line a baking tray with baking paper.

2. Use a food processor or coffee grinder to grind the oats to a fine flour. Add the oats to a mixing bowl.

3. Add the remaining dry ingredients, including the fresh parsley and chilli flakes.

4. Add the tahini and water. Mix well with a spatula or fork, then use your hands to form the mixture into a ball of dough.

5. Sprinkle brown rice flour onto a wooden board or kitchen counter. Knead the dough for several minutes on the floured surface, then divide the dough it into about 6 segments*. Use a rolling pin to roll each segment, one at a time, to a thickness of about 3mm. Use a pizza cutter (or knife) to cut the dough into small crackers, roughly 4cm x 4cm.

6. Transfer the crackers to the baking tray. Prick each cracker with the prongs of a fork a couple of times. Bake for approximately 15 -18 minutes, or until the crackers are a light golden brown colour.

7. The crackers will harden as they cool. Once cooled, store in an air tight container.

*I divide the dough into segments as I find it easier to ‘manage’ (ie. roll and cut) a smaller quantity of dough.

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The Tiny Vegans’ Verdicts

The tiny vegans are enthusiastic about spicy food, so I use the full 1/4 tsp in this recipe. If you – or your kids – are not keen on spicy crackers, use 1/8 tsp for a subtler ‘kick’.

The tiny vegans enjoy these crackers plain, or with dips like hummus.

***

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This recipe is a nut-free version of a recipe that I developed for Vegan MoFo, Nutty Cinnamon Bites.

Ingredients

1 cup oats

1/4 cup sunflower seeds

1/4 cup raw carob powder

1 tsp cinnamon

1 cup dates

1/2 cup sultanas or pitted prunes

1 tsp pure vanilla extract

coconut sugar and/or shredded coconut for coating

Method

1. Place all of the ingredients into a food processor in the order that they are listed.

2. Process the mixture for about 2 minutes, until it clumps together and forms a large ball on the blade. The mixture will stick together when pressed between your fingers and thumb.

3. To form into balls: Scoop out a heaped tablespoon of the mixture, and roll it between the palms of your hands until it forms a ball. Repeat with the remaining mixture. Roll the balls in shredded coconut and/or coconut sugar. Can be eaten immediately, or refrigerated for half an hour before serving. Store leftovers in the fridge.

4. To form into bars: Transfer the mixture from the food processor to a loaf tin lined with baking paper. Press the mixture into the tin with your fingers or a spatula. Smooth the top. Place in the freezer for a couple of hours. Remove from the freezer and cut into bars. The bars can be topped with raw cacao nibs or shredded coconut.

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The Tiny Vegans’ Verdicts

This recipe is a popular lunchbox snack with the tiny vegans – in ball or bar form.

Every Monday, I feature a delicious vegan recipe that is enjoyed by my own family. I hope your family enjoys it too.

Ally 🙂

{Recipe} Sweet and Sour Tofu and Vegetables

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This recipe consists of a sweet and sour sauce that is free of the questionable ingredients that the store-bought and restaurant versions contain. No bright pink sauce here!

I should warn you, lest you curse me afterwards. You will need to do some washing up after preparing this dish – a wok, a saucepan (two, if you cook rice), a fry pan or skillet, and an immersion blender.

But it will be worth it, I promise! The meal is scrumptious and moreish, and the food preparation stage is simple. Maybe you could offer to cook, if your partner washes up. 😉

Ingredients

(Inspired by a recipe in The Vegan Health Plan by Amanda Sweet*)

(serves 4)

250 g firm organic tofu, cubed

1 1/2 cups chopped white mushrooms

1/2 cup sliced celery

1 medium-sized red capsicum (bell pepper), chopped (equates to 1 1/4 cup chopped)

3/4 cup pineapple pieces, fresh or tinned

1 1/2 cups carrot slices

1 tomato, chopped into 8 wedges

1/2 large red onion, thinly sliced

3 cloves garlic, crushed

1/2 tsp freshly grated ginger

1 tin/400g of crushed tomatoes

200ml low-sodium vegetable stock

1/4 cup low-sodium soy sauce

2 Tbsp apple cider vinegar

1 1/2 Tbsp raw sugar

2 Tbsp organic cornflour

1/4 cup raw cashews

Pepper

Method

Make the sweet and sour sauce first: 

1. Use an immersion blender, blender or small food processor to liquidise the tinned tomatoes, until smooth. Set aside.

2. To a medium saucepan (on a low heat), add the cornflour. Add the stock slowly, and stir with a whisk to avoid lumps forming.

3. Once the cornflour is incorporated, add the liquidised tomatoes, soy sauce, apple cider vinegar, and sugar. Bring to a boil, then simmer gently for a few minutes. Taste the sauce – if you prefer it sweeter, add additional sugar. Remove the saucepan from the heat, and set aside.

Prepare the tofu:

4. Cut the tofu into cubes and cook it in a fry pan, until lightly browned on all sides (I use my cafe-style sandwich press to brown the tofu). Set aside.

Prepare the vegetables:

5. Heat 2 Tbsp of water in a wok. Add the onions, and cook until softened.

2. Add the garlic and ginger, stir well. Cook for about 60 seconds, stirring occasionally.

3. Add the carrots and celery. Cook for 3 minutes, stirring occasionally.

4. Add the capsicum. Cook for 60 seconds.

5. Add the mushroom and pineapple. Cook for 2 mins.

6. Add the tofu and tomatoes, and the sweet and sour sauce. Mix well. Bring the sauce to the boil, then allow it to simmer gently for 2-3 minutes.

7. Add the cashews to the wok just prior to serving. Stir through.

8. Garnish with coriander or additional cashews. Serve with brown basmati or jasmine rice.

* This book is out of print.

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The Tiny Vegans’ Verdicts

My daughter enjoyed this meal, as I expected. One of 7-year-old Tiny Vegan’s favourite restaurant dishes is sweet and sour ‘not-pork’. At the very least, I knew that the sauce would be well-received by him.

And it was. In fact, he happily ate the contents of his plate.

I merely refrained from including mushroom and capsicum in his serving. Which, in turn, inspired 4-year-old Tiny Vegan to request his meal minus the mushroom and capsicum.

The disdain expressed for mushrooms by some of the tiny vegans is really quite disheartening for a mushroom admirer like myself. Cooked capsicum isn’t popular either. At least they’ll eat it raw.

***

The Virtual Vegan Potluck will be upon us soon. I will be participating again. This time, in the salad section. I am incorporating the featured ingredient into my recipe – beetroot (beets). Sign up at this page by 9 November (US time).

Every Monday, I feature a delicious vegan recipe that is enjoyed by my own family. I hope your family enjoys it too (with or without the mushrooms!).

Ally

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